Choosing And Using Walking Frames
Written by Craig B

Choosing And Using Walking Frames

Walking frames can give people a greater level of support and balance. Read on to learn how one can work for you!

Comfort

You need your walking frame to be simple and comfortable to use. You will need it suited to your weight as well as your height. Give a few different models a go and see which one suits you needs.

Transportation And Storage

If your walking frame needs to be stored or transported it will need to be foldable. at the very least you will require a secure place away from the outside elements so it can maintain its durability.

Getting Fit

When being fitted ensure the crease in your hand is at the same level as the hand grip on the walker. You will need your elbows to bend between fifteen to thirty degrees so you can be both comfortable and safe.

Usage

Its is best to be facing forward when using your frame. use your leg that has been impaired first and bring the frame forward, then your less inflicted leg. Do not position the frame too far forward and when sitting down, use the arms of the chair or someone else for support.

What Are Rollators?

These are walking frames that have wheels and offer increased stability and balance and also a great compromise between a walker and a cane. They can also include baskets for shipping and seats when you need a rest!

Having a home safety assessment performed to identify fall risk and provide safety recommendations followed up by installation, can greatly reduce your risk of falls in your home environment. You are unique and your needs are too!

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What You Should Know About Non-slip Bathtub & Shower Floor Treatments

A Non Slip Surface Treatment For Fall-Proofing Your Bathroom We spend a great deal of time in a place where significant fall risks lurk – the bathroom. The bathroom is the number one place for falls in the home – ironically, it is also the most likely to be overlooked when it comes to fall [...]

Is Fall Prevention the New Taboo Topic?

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Written by webtechs

When Denial Gets in the Way of Safety

As we age, there is no doubt in our hearts we feel young. And although being young at heart is wonderful, this ethereal feeling is no match for the ever-changing state of our bodies and the status of our health.

As we age, changes take place with our health that can dramatically affect our ability to navigate our home environment safely. Although falls are not necessarily a part of aging, 40% of nursing home admissions are due to slip and fall accidents. These accidents can affect the course of our ability to be independent and live quality lives at home.

Of course walking around in bubble wrap to keep from falling in your home is not a doable solution – it’s hot, unsightly, and frankly not a fashion stopper. Many individuals elect to do nothing, feeling invincible. This denial can lead to unexpected accidents, which then brings you into crisis mode. However, seeking preventative solutions in advance of a potential crisis, is the most optimal way to stay safe while aging at home. Intervention IS prevention.

Top of your list should be a Home Safety Assessment. The American and British Geriatric Societies report, “ Multifactorial risk assessment and intervention strategies are effective in decreasing the rates of falls and have a similar risk reduction to that of other prevention measures such as statins for cardiovascular disease”.

What can I expect from a home safety assessment? Who will evaluate my environment? What happens following the assessment?

Our physical therapist provides a home safety assessment, during which time, not only will you be evaluated navigating your home environment, but the environment itself will be evaluated for safety hazards in a variety of rooms, including the bathroom, where falls occur most frequently in the home.

The therapist will make clinical recommendations based on your individual diagnosis or physical limitations to ensure optimal fall prevention safety outcomes, customized for you in your space.

We complete the process by providing and clinically installing all needed items. We provide a warranty for all of our products and services, and we are licensed, bonded and insured.

You may not have concerns about falling now, but denying that it’s a possibility puts you at greater risk. Once injuries occur from falls, often there is no turning back. Protect your health, independence and future, scheduled your clinically guided home safety assessment.

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Non-Slip-Shower-Floor
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What You Should Know About Non-slip Bathtub & Shower Floor Treatments

A Non Slip Surface Treatment For Fall-Proofing Your Bathroom

We spend a great deal of time in a place where significant fall risks lurk – the bathroom. The bathroom is the number one place for falls in the home – ironically, it is also the most likely to be overlooked when it comes to fall prevention safety.

The moment you set foot into your bathroom, you have entered a zone of unstable footing due to slippery or wet showers, tubs, and floors. Bathroom rugs are often slippery and gather when stepping onto and are also significant trip and fall hazards.

Rather than elect to become another bathroom fall statistic, understanding fall risks and implementing interventions can significantly reduce your risk of slip and fall accidents.

Coefficient Of Friction – Measuring The Fall Risk

Coefficient of Friction describes friction levels on flooring both dry and wet. Floors with low COF levels are more likely to be slippery and pose a fall risk. OSHA and ADA recommend friction levels of flooring surfaces to be .5 and above in order to be considered safe. Friction levels falling below that are critically dangerous when wet. Most homes have floor, tub and shower friction levels of .5 or below.

What You Can Do To Reduce Fall Risk In The Tub or Shower

Most homes use non-slip mats in the shower. Not only can these become breeding grounds for, harboring countless bacteria and mold, but they are also major trip hazards and should not be used for sure footing. According to PrudentReviews, “If you don’t like the idea of an anti-slip shower mat, you can install clear anti-slip adhesive treads or apply an anti-slip formula specially designed for showers and baths“. As you can see, non-slip shower treatments are a longer-lasting, healthier alternative to tub or shower mats.

Non-Slip Shower Floor Surface Treatment

Non-Slip-Shower-Floor

Non-slip shower floor surface treatments are simple to apply, environmentally friendly, and drastically reduces fall risk by increasing the friction levels on wet floors, bathtubs, and shower surfaces. There is no visible change to the surface – the only time you will notice the treatment, is when the bathroom, tub or shower areas are wet.  Then, you will have increased friction for better traction and safer navigation on wet surface areas.

The non-slip shower flooring solution will take your once dangerously low friction levels to OSHA and ADA safety recommended higher levels so you can navigate your bathroom safely and with confidence.

Non-slip bathroom floor treatments are just one of the elderly fall prevention solutions we offer. To learn about our full line of services, visit our FAQ page, or give us a call at 480.214.9725.

Non Slip Bathtub Treatment

Non-Slip-Bathtub-Treatment

When searching for non-slip bathtub treatment solutions, experts like HomeGuide say you should apply a non-slip spray. We agree! We specialize in the application of non-slip, long-lasting bathtub treatments, which when applied causes a chemical reaction that leaves the surface of hard mineral existing floors and porcelain/enamel bathtubs with a higher friction level and no visible changes. Our product has been developed and proven for concrete, quarry tile, Spanish tile, ceramic tile, glazed brick, marble, terrazzo, porcelain/enamel, and many other hard mineral surfaces.

The end result is an increase in the coefficient of friction up to 400% when subjected to water.

  • Reduced risk of falling
  • No more rubber mats or decals
  • No more worries when floors are wet
  • Feet will no longer slip out from under you
  • USDA approved
  • Non-toxic/environmentally safe
  • No downtime! Floors immediately available for use upon completion
  • Easy floor care
  • 2-year warranty
  • Meets ADA and OSHA Standards

What are Non-Slip Floor Surface Treatments for Bathtubs and Showers?

Bathtub Non Slip Coating

“Non-Slip Surface Treatment” or “Anti Slip Surface Treatment” make surfaces slip-resistant in shower bases, bathtub bottoms, concrete or tile floors. When applied, a chemical reaction happens that causes the surface to have higher friction levels with no visible changes.

Applications include:

  • Bathtub floors
  • Shower floors
  • Concrete
  • Quarry tile
  • Spanish tile
  • ceramic tile
  • Glazed brick
  • Marble
  • Terrazzo
  • Porcelain
  • Enamel
  • Many hard mineral surfaces

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Is Fall Prevention the New Taboo Topic?

Yes, it’s difficult to brooch with our aging parents and family members and yet, it’s terrifying to not! One must then weigh the pros and cons of saving a few egos in contrast to saving lives. Sounds extreme, but every 19 minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. So it begs the question, why then, not have the conversation?!

The most important part of having the conversation is empathy, listening and understanding that for those experiencing changes in their ability to safely navigate their home or other environments – it’s chock full of emotions. Many feel depressed, saddened and even hopeless, feeling like independence is slowly slipping away. But indeed, now is the time for “reframe”.

Taking action to outfit your home with fall prevention safety modifications is less about loss of independence and more about prolonging independence, allowing an aging population confidence, loss of fear and comfort in remaining in their own homes.

Avoid the taboo epithet and begin the conversation. Intervention is prevention…and waiting to have a conversation after the crisis..may be too late. Once a fall has taken place, ancillary complications come into play, and it can dramatically alter the direction of ones’ life.

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Fall Risk – How to Determine if You or Your Loved One is at Risk of Falling in the Home

Here are some simple questions you can ask yourself to determine if you or a loved one may be at risk for falling in your home:

Do you exercise regularly?

  • Maintaining a regular exercise program to increase strength, balance and coordination and greatly reduce the risk of falls. Recommended exercise for fall reduction are evidence-based exercises/programs such as Tai Chi.

Are you taking multiple medications?

  • Taking multiple medications can increase fall risk, due to side effects and possible drug interactions. Regularly reviewing medications with a healthcare provide can reduce the risk of medication related fall risk. It’s important to remember to dispose of unused or expired medications.

Have you modified your home environment?

  • Modifying the home environment to reduce hazards such as slippery floors, poor lighting, uneven surfaces, removal of cords and other household obstacles can reduce the risk of unnecessary falls in the home. The bathroom is the number one place for falls in the home. Addressing balance issues in the shower and commode areas through the addition of safety grab bars, shower chairs, transfer benches and toilet risers can reduce the risk of falls in the bathroom.

Have you had a home safety assessment to determine if you are at risk of falls in your home?

  • Studies have shown that addressing multiple fall risk factors from daily activities and exercise, medication, footwear, eye exams and home environment, have the ability to reduce fall risk as statin medication does for cardiovascular disease.

Having a home safety assessment performed to identify fall risk and provide safety recommendations followed up by installation, can greatly reduce your risk of falls in your home environment. You are unique and your needs are too!

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Fall Risk at Discharge – What You Need To Know

  • There is a high incidence of falls after hospital discharge, particularly among patients who are functionally dependent. Major fall risk factors at discharge include: decline in mobility, use of assistive devices and cognitive impairment/confusion.
  • Patients who were functionally dependent and needed professional help after discharge had the highest rate of falls.
  • Hospitalization in older adults, including those who are admitted for medical problems, rehabilitation and acute care, has been shown to be associated with decline in function and mobility – creating a higher risk of slip and fall accidents.
  • The period after discharge has been shown to be associated with high risk of falls, social problems and medication errors, with up to 30% of older people experiencing an adverse event following hospital discharge.
  • 45% of older people fall in the period following discharge.
  • One study examining the incidence of falls in older, recently hospitalized medical patients requiring post-discharge home care, found that falls were substantially increased during the first month after hospital discharge.
  • Research has shown that fall prevention home safety assessment and home safety modification intervention immediately following discharge critically reduces the risk of falls once at home.
  • A full clinical assessment of function as it relates to how individuals are navigating their environment doing daily tasks (restroom, shower, walking through the home). Installation of safety grab bars, commode risers, shower chairs, ramps and rails are just a few of the modifications which can be made that will reduce fall risk.
  • Typically, upon discharge, families and are overwhelmed and often don’t know where to turn for resources (you can bring in MB home safety here if you’d like). Coming home following discharge is a critical time, where patients are often in a weakened, tired and cognitively impaired state. Family members rush to “get something in”. Just having a “safety grab bar” won’t do the trick, where your bar is placed and clinical attention to the placement of any modification is imperative in not risking further injury.

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How Does Your Home Rate on Fall Prevention Safety? A Room-by-Room Guide

We’ve all read about things we can do to avoid unnecessary slip and fall accidents in our home, but how closely have you looked at specifics. Here are a few things you can do in your home, you may not have thought of, addressed or knew would assist you in being falls free in and around your home:

  1. Ensure exterior pathways are free of holes, loose stones/bricks, uneven pavement, debris or other slipping hazards.
  2. All entrances are clutter free.
  3. Handrails are present on both sides of all steps and stairways both inside and outside the home.
  4. Kitchen cabinets are easily accessible, with frequently used items placed on lower shelves.
  5. Uncarpeted steps feature a non-slip surface such as adhesive strips.
  6. Electrical and phone cords are placed out of the way, along the wall.
  7. Hallway lighting is easily accessible.
  1. Safety grab bars are present at shower entry and interior of shower as needed.
  2. Bathroom rugs should be rubber, based, non-slip. Bathroom floors, tubs and shower surfaces are treated with non-slip product to ensure increased COF (Coefficient of Friction), when surfaces are wet – critically reducing fall risk – Note: The Bathroom is the number one place for falls in the home).
  3. Access to telephones both landline and/or mobile in or near multiple rooms, including the bathroom.
  4. Furniture should be arranged to allow for easy, obstacle free passage.
  5. Do doorways safely accommodate walkers, wheelchairs and/or transport chairs?

If you or a loved one is uncertain about falls risk factors in your home, schedule a free home safety assessment today, performed by a MEASURAbilities Home Safety Physical Therapist, who will provide clinically guided solutions for you in your environment.

Learn About Our Home Safety Assessments Performed by a Physical Therapist

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