Age In Place House Plans
Written by Brian B

Aging In Place House Plans

Age In Place House Plans

For seniors looking to age in place, there are many ways to turn your house into a forever home. Safety is crucial when planning any updates or remodels to the home after age 55. Customizing your home to age in place will undoubtedly make it a safer and more valuable environment. Here are a few ways to create a safe house for senior living.

How To Create A Home To Age In Place

There are many minor and significant updates one can make to create a safer living environment. Whether it’s a minor adjustment or full-scale remodel, here are a few simple steps you can take to age in place as comfortably as possible.

First-Floor Living

The suggestion is for all senior citizens to move permanently to the first floor. This is the safest way to age in place at home. There are many home designers that can configure the home to your liking and safety needs. Some necessities for first-floor living include a full bathroom, efficient kitchen space, living spaces and laundry access. Roomy pathways are also recommended. Install railings in pathways and secure all carpeting to the floor.

Easier Entryways

The best way to create easier access to your home is by installing a no-step entrance. This means you should create a flat landing outside the door that is also sheltered from any potential inclement weather. Secondly, add doors that are at least 36 inches wide with lever handles in place. A nearby bench is a good idea to have indoors, as this can serve as a safe place to change footwear. All rugs inside and outside need to be secured with nonslip rubber pads underneath.

Safety In The Bathroom

Falls in the bathroom can be extremely dangerous for the elderly. Thankfully, many bathrooms can be designed with safety in mind. Design the bathroom with lots of space for the potential of wheelchairs or even installing more grab bars in the future. Entry doors should slide open like barn doors. Tub/shower areas should come complete with grab bars. You can also install grab bars around the toilet.

Kitchen Designs

Ensure all frequently used items are always within easy reach. Open kitchen plans, which are very popular nowadays, typically maximize lighting and sightlines. Layered lighting tends to be aging-friendly. There really is no limit on designs or types of materials to use for the kitchen, the goal is simply to keep everything within reach and make the space easy to maneuver.

Kitchen Safety

Home Safety Checklist

A home safety assessment offers a unique way to proactively assess your home’s safety. This assessment can help seniors who live independently or have an older home with potential dangers. Check out the CDC’s guidelines here for more information.

A home safety checklist needs to include the following items:

Kitchen

  1. Keep most frequently used items on the lower shelves.
  2. Have a sturdy step stool in the kitchen, if needed.

Bedrooms

  1. Tub and/or shower floors should have nonstick rubber mats.
  2. Have grab bars to use for getting in and out of the tub.
  3. Grab bars can be placed around the toilet, as well.

Bathrooms

  1. Light(s) should be near the bed within reach.
  2. Light the path from the bed to the bathroom well with nightlights.

Stairs

  1. Remove any loose objects from the stairs/steps.
  2. Fix any broken or uneven steps.
  3. Make sure there is no loose or torn carpeting in the area.
  4. Have sufficient lighting above the stairways.
  5. Make sure there is a light switch at the bottom and top of the staircase.
  6. Have handrails on both sides, making sure they are not loose or broken.
  7. Handrails should run the full length of the stairway.

Floors

  1. Keep paths free of any furniture in each room of the house.
  2. Secure all throw rugs with double-sided tape or nonslip backing.
  3. Make sure there are no other objects, such as papers, boxes, shoes or blankets on the floors.
  4. Keep all wires securely taped or coiled next to walls.

Senior Falls At Home

Fire Safety Checklist

There were more than 363,000 residential fires in the year 2018, according to SafeWise. With more than 3,000 lives lost in these fires, it’s crucial that homeowners do everything they can to prevent these disasters. Follow this guide:

Buy A Fire Extinguisher

Every homeowner should have at least one fire extinguisher in the home. Make sure all family members know exactly where it is located and how to operate the extinguisher. Storing the extinguisher by the kitchen and/or fireplace is suggested.

Install Fire Alarms

Fire alarms should be installed on every level of the home. Some alarms can be monitored using a mobile app.

Unplug Any Unused Appliances

Ensure that all appliances are in good working order, and that no wires are frayed. Do not overload any electrical outlets. It is suggested to unplug any appliances that aren’t used frequently.

How To Get Aging In Place Home Design

Thinking about adding safety grab bars, a raised toilet seat or other modifications to prevent falls in your home? Our physical and occupational therapists provide free home safety screenings, and will make clinically guided fall prevention recommendations, as well as create a customized plan to fit your individual needs. We follow up with clinically guided installation of all of our fall prevention home safety products.

Our clinically guided solutions will ensure you and your loved ones can navigate your home environment safely and with confidence. Visit our Home Safety Solutions page to learn about the products and services we provide and install (we are licensed, bonded and insured), to help you prevent falls in your home.

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What Is A Home Safety Assessment
Written by webtechs

What Is A Home Safety Assessment?

What Is A Home Safety Assessment

A home safety assessment is an overall evaluation of your home to identify potential hazards, especially for senior citizens.

Home Safety Assessment For Seniors

If you are an older adult or have a loved one living on their own, a home safety assessment is a great way to find and eliminate any safety concerns. This assessment is typically performed by a licensed healthcare professional, including medical social workers or occupational therapists. The assessment may include things such as home improvement recommendations. Medical professionals may recommend installing handrails and extra lighting, for instance.

Since falls are one of the most common causes of injury among seniors, these assessments are a crucial preventative measure towards improving safety. One in four Americans age 65-plus fall every year, according to the National Council on Aging. Falls are the number one cause of injury-related deaths for seniors today.

Home Safety Checklist

A home safety assessment offers a unique way to proactively assess your home’s safety. This assessment can help seniors who live independently or have an older home with potential dangers. Check out the CDC’s guidelines here for more information.

A home safety checklist needs to include the following items:

Floors

  1. Keep paths free of any furniture in each room of the house.
  2. Secure all throw rugs with double-sided tape or nonslip backing.
  3. Make sure there are no other objects, such as papers, boxes, shoes or blankets on the floors.
  4. Keep all wires securely taped or coiled next to walls.

Kitchen

  1. Keep most frequently used items on the lower shelves.
  2. Have a sturdy step stool in the kitchen, if needed.

Bedrooms

  1. Tub and/or shower floors should have nonstick rubber mats.
  2. Have grab bars to use for getting in and out of the tub.
  3. Grab bars can be placed around the toilet, as well.

Bathrooms

  1. Light(s) should be near the bed within reach.
  2. Light the path from the bed to the bathroom well with nightlights.

Stairs

  1. Remove any loose objects from the stairs/steps.
  2. Fix any broken or uneven steps.
  3. Make sure there is no loose or torn carpeting in the area.
  4. Have sufficient lighting above the stairways.
  5. Make sure there is a light switch at the bottom and top of the staircase.
  6. Have handrails on both sides, making sure they are not loose or broken.
  7. Handrails should run the full length of the stairway.

How To Get A Home Safety Assessment

Thinking about adding safety grab bars, a raised toilet seat or other modifications to prevent falls in your home? Our physical and occupational therapists provide free home safety screenings, and will make clinically guided fall prevention recommendations, as well as create a customized plan to fit your individual needs. We follow up with clinically guided installation of all of our fall prevention home safety products.

Our clinically guided solutions will ensure you and your loved ones can navigate your home environment safely and with confidence. Visit our Home Safety Solutions page to learn about the products and services we provide and install (we are licensed, bonded and insured), to help you prevent falls in your home.

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HOW TO INSTALL GRAB BARS IN TILE SHOWER
Written by Brian B

How To Install Grab Bars In Tile Shower

HOW TO INSTALL GRAB BARS IN TILE SHOWER

Shower grab bars are a necessity for the elderly. The good news is grab bars are easy to install. Find out how to do this below!

Installing A Grab Bar In 7 Steps

Installing a grab bar for a tile shower shouldn’t take any longer then 30 minutes. Follow these steps for installation.

Step 1. Marking The Mounting Area With Painter’s Tape

  • Get painter’s tape and use it to mark the spots on the wall where you’ll be installing the grab bar(s).
  • Extend the tape to the same length of the grab bar.
  • ADA requirements say grab bars must be between 33-36 inches above the shower floor.

Step 2. Using The Stud Finder

  • Take your stud finder and place it on the wall, searching for the nearest studs.
  • Once the studs are located, mark it with the painter’s tape.
  • This is the area where you will drill holes to mount the plates for the grab bar.

Step 3. Mark Pilot Hole Locations

  • Use the mounting plate on your grab bar as a guide to mark the holes where the screws will eventually be inserted onto the studs.
  • Make sure to follow the grab bar instructions at this time and moving forward.

Step 4. Drill Pilot Holes

  • Find the appropriately sized drill bit, then insert it into the drill.
  • More than likely, the drill bit should be a 1/4 or 1/8 bit.
  • Drill holes into the location that you marked over the studs.
  • Drilling through tile may require more pressure than regular drywall, so adjust accordingly.

Step 5. Drill Screws Into Tile

  • Grab the screws and drill mounting plate into its locations.
  • If the screw seems stuck, pull the drill out and drive it in once again.
  • After the first mounting plate is in place, put the grab bar into position.
  • Hold the grab bar in place while you drill the second mounting plate.

Step 6. Applying Silicone Caulk

  • After both plates have been mounted, take the caulk gun and run it along the exterior of both plates.
  • This will help to prevent water leaks which can cause mold and mildew.

Step 7. Testing The Grab Bar

  • Wait around 45-60 minutes for the caulk to dry.
  • Then test the bar by giving it a quick tug to ensure it is secure.
  • The grab bar should not move at it.
  • If it does move, you must re-install it.
  • Apply enough pressure when pulling because it needs to hold your body weight.

Necessary Tools For Installation

  • Drill with drill bits.
  • Stud finder.
  • Tape measure.
  • Wall anchors.
  • Painter’s tape.
  • Grab bar and plates.
  • Protective eye goggles.

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Home Safety Tips
Written by Brian B

Home Safety Tips

Home Safety Tips

Creating a safe environment at home, especially for seniors, is very important. Watch out for these home hazards, and use the following tips to stay safe!

Common Home Safety Hazards

Here are a few of the most common residential safety hazards:

  • Fires.
  • Falls.
  • Choking.
  • Cuts.
  • Carbon monoxide.
  • Strangling.
  • Drowning.
  • Burns. 

Fires

There were more than 363,000 residential fires in the year 2018, according to SafeWise. With more than 3,000 lives lost in these fires, it’s crucial that homeowners do everything they can to prevent these disasters. Follow this guide:

Buy A Fire Extinguisher

Every homeowner should have at least one fire extinguisher in the home. Make sure all family members know exactly where it is located and how to operate the extinguisher. Storing the extinguisher by the kitchen and/or fireplace is suggested.

Install Fire Alarms

Fire alarms should be installed on every level of the home. Some alarms can be monitored using a mobile app.

Unplug Any Unused Appliances

Ensure that all appliances are in good working order, and that no wires are frayed. Do not overload any electrical outlets. It is suggested to unplug any appliances that aren’t used frequently.

Falls

Make sure your home is as safe as possible to neutralize any possibility of slips or falls. Follow these tips:

Floors

  • Keep paths free of any furniture in each room of the house.
  • Secure all throw rugs with double-sided tape or nonslip backing.
  • Make sure there are no other objects, such as papers, boxes, shoes or blankets on the floors.
  • Keep all wires securely taped or coiled next to walls.

Kitchen

  • Keep most frequently used items on the lower shelves.
  • Have a sturdy step stool in the kitchen, if needed.

Bedrooms

  • Tub and/or shower floors should have nonstick rubber mats.
  • Have grab bars to use for getting in and out of the tub.
  • Grab bars can be placed around the toilet, as well.

Bathrooms

  • Light(s) should be near the bed within reach.
  • Light the path from the bed to the bathroom well with nightlights.

Stairs

  • Remove any loose objects from the stairs/steps.
  • Fix any broken or uneven steps.
  • Make sure there is no loose or torn carpeting in the area.
  • Have sufficient lighting above the stairways.
  • Make sure there is a light switch at the bottom and top of the staircase.
  • Have handrails on both sides, making sure they are not loose or broken.
  • Handrails should run the full length of the stairway.

Choking

Unfortunately, choking is one of the leading causes of accidental deaths in the U.S. Use these safety tips to protect yourself and your family from this hazard.

  • Inspect children’s toys for any loose parts.
  • Keep all choking hazards out of reach.
  • Cut up children’s food in small pieces.

Other Hazards

Pests and chemical hazards always pose a threat to homeowners. Use these safety tips:

Top Non Slip Shower Mats For The Elderly
Written by Brian B

Top Non Slip Shower Mats For The Elderly

Top Non Slip Shower Mats For The Elderly

If you are searching for “non slip shower mats for the elderly“, Measurabilities is here to highlight some of our top picks!

Yimobra Memory Foam Bath Mat

Seniors looking for soft shower mats cannot do much better than the Yimobra memory foam mats. This mat will work for any area in the bathroom due to its comfortable feel. There is much more to love about this product beyond its soft texture, though! The mat can be customized to fit your exact needs, available in a wide variety of sizes. One of the biggest benefits of this product is its tremendous rate of water absorption.

Features:

  • Comfort due to use of memory foam.
  • Great water absorption rate.
  • Wide range of sizes available. 

See more information about the Yimobra mat here.

Webos Foldable Non Slip Rubber Bath Mat

This bath mat does not feature suction cups, as it is meant to be positioned on textured surfaces. In some cases, suction cups have damaged certain bathroom surfaces. A foldable design will make storing this mat a breeze. Just because it has no suction cups, does not mean it’s not secure. In fact, that could not be further from the truth. This is a terrific mat option for seniors.

Features:

  • Lots of drainage holes.
  • Dries off quickly.
  • Three different color options.

See more information about the Webos mat here.

Epica Anti-Slip Bath Mat

This model is extra long, meaning it can be used both as a tub and non-slip shower mat. Beyond the versatility, this mat has many suction cups, repelling water naturally. Once the mat is placed on the floor, you can rest assured that it will not move an inch. This mat was designed specifically for the elderly, but works great for children, as well. The Epica is also mildew and mold resistant.

Features:

  • Sturdy to the floor.
  • Mold/mildew resistant.
  • Great for large bathrooms.

See more information about the Epica mat here.

Vive Shower Mat

Easily covering the full surface of a standard shower stall, the Vive shower mat is known to eliminate pooling water. This mat features 200 individual suction cups to stay in place. It is also mold and mildew resistant, just like the Epica mat. Most reviewers of this product have raved about its soft and comfort feel to the touch.

Features:

  • Easily covers large shower area.
  • One central hole to eliminate water buildup.
  • Comfortable on feet.

See more information about the Vive mat here.

Chenille Striped Rug Slip Bath Mat

This is one of the most popular non slip models because it is machine washable. The Chenille offers a soft cushioned first step out of the shower. Lots of suction cups with this model allow it to stick securely to any surface. The design is also very attractive and customizable.

Features:

  • Great suction strength.
  • Machine washable.
  • Comfortable. 

See more information about the Chenille mat here.

Senior In Old Home
Written by Brian B

Why Might An Older House Have More Safety Risks Than A New One?

Senior In Old Home

Older homes are typically not as modern or safe as newer homes. This will leave individuals, especially senior citizens, more susceptible to falls and/or injuries.

If you are currently searching for “why might an older house have more safety risks than a new one“, this article will detail the various potential safety hazards.

New Homes Vs Old Homes

Here are a few things that can differ between newer and older homes:

  • Location
  • Price
  • Availability
  • Maintenance Requirements
  • Home Safety
  • Energy Efficiency

All of these items can influence whether you want to live in a newer or older home. Yet, for seniors citizens, newer homes are better suited for their safety needs.

Pros Of Old Homes

Sure, there are many benefits of buying older homes instead of newer models. Most older homes have ideal location, since they were built closer to town centers. Easy access to surrounding restaurants, shops and other amenities are certainly a plus. Older homes are typically in established neighborhoods with long traditions and a greater sense of community.

Older homes, of course, tend to be cheaper than newer homes. Depending on location and condition, these older homes will come with a lower price tag than newer ones in the same area. These older homes are also great for homebuyers not wanting to wait long to move in. Count on excellent availability since older models won’t require any finishing touches from developers, unlike newer homes.

Cons Of Old Homes

Unfortunately, too often the cons will outweigh the pros when it comes to purchasing and living in an old home. For seniors, keeping up with maintenance or remodeling needs that come with an old home is nearly impossible, physically. Some old homes will have inefficient plumbing and/or heating systems. Replacing heating equipment, air conditioners and electrical wires creates a very dangerous situation for seniors. Plus, any repairs will likely come with a hefty price tag.

It’s no secret that newer homes are safer than old ones. Newer homes may come fully equipped with safety features like security locks, lights and burglar alarms. This equipment is essential for a senior living alone. If fires start in the home, is your older model designed to protect you? Newer homes will have smoke alarms and fire doors.

Energy efficiency may not be at the top of the list for the elderly, but this can pose a danger, as well. You’ll want all your walls, floors and ceilings to be well insulated. Seniors will need the home to be at a temperature of their liking, avoiding any potential illnesses.

Old Home Safety Checklist

Here are a few things you can do in your home, you may not have thought of, addressed or knew would assist you in being falls free in and around your home:

  1. Ensure exterior pathways are free of holes, loose stones/bricks, uneven pavement, debris or other slipping hazards.
  2. All entrances are clutter free.
  3. Handrails are present on both sides of all steps and stairways both inside and outside the home.
  4. Kitchen cabinets are easily accessible, with frequently used items placed on lower shelves.
  5. Uncarpeted steps feature a non-slip surface such as adhesive strips.
  6. Electrical and phone cords are placed out of the way, along the wall.
  7. Hallway lighting is easily accessible.
  8. Safety grab bars are present at shower entry and interior of shower as needed.
  9. Bathroom rugs should be rubber, based, non-slip. Bathroom floors, tubs and shower surfaces are treated with non-slip product to ensure increased COF (Coefficient of Friction), when surfaces are wet – critically reducing fall risk – Note: The Bathroom is the number one place for falls in the home).
  10. Access to telephones both landline and/or mobile in or near multiple rooms, including the bathroom.
  11. Furniture should be arranged to allow for easy, obstacle free passage.
  12. Do doorways safely accommodate walkers, wheelchairs and/or transport chairs?